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Thread: This makes two SuperTrapp clad Ninja Sportbikes that are leaping the charts

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Blackfoot, ID
    Posts
    95

    Default This makes two SuperTrapp clad Ninja Sportbikes that are leaping the charts

    First off, I recently repeated some modifications to one of my ZX-9R's fueling & SuperTrapp diffuser settings that are unconventional. Well the carb settings are, not so much on the ST end. They're not conventional in the sense that they deviate slightly in significant ways from those tuning carburetor top-down or bottom up methods, but follow the overall format of top-down. The other significant factor however that makes these settings work comes from the standpoint I'm not running either the stock exhaust nor one of those other exhaust/muffler combinations from SuperTrapp's competitors. In other words, my bikes having SuperTrapp mufflers makes them unique to this model of motorcycle, less one or two other's I've stumbled across online. The engine does have to breath better in order to take advantage of these tune settings, but the way the aluminum racing series universal bolt-on works, seems to perform best...but this is only conjecture since I've only run the racing series SuperTrapp on my 9s. Other STs might perform similarly as well. That's all I'm saying.

    Some history. Back in 2008 I picked up my first ZX-9R with the intention of installing an aftermarket Supertrapp to open up some performance potential. After about a year of constant experimental modifications I settled on a sweet spot that provided better performance throughout the engine's envelope, as well as, a free boost over the bike's stock MPG capabilities. It was a win-win.

    That lasted for about seven years before I was indirectly presented with a tuning concept that bucked conventional wisdom and was an avenue I hadn't yet experimented with. Based on the layman mathematical percentages I was looking at, I figured I might be able to pick up an additional 3% better MPG, but initial test results showed that power characteristics had some trade-offs. On the plus side was an unusual boost to MPG, greater than the math was predicting.

    So not completely what I was after, but I persevered rather than giving up. I ended up having to open up my Supertrapp a couple more diffusers to take advantage of whatever was happening with the new engine flow tune. A little more tinkering inside and I arrived at a performance advantage over the previous tune in both power and MPG. I call the new settings supercruise, after the demonstrable advantages the bike has over all other bikes as overall speed increases.

    It was one thing to have other riders confirm the results as I was recording them, but I've since had two distance runs verified in recent years by an outside governing body. Either their guidelines are crap, which would throw into question all of their results for other motorcycles who've had their results measured in this way or my results are in fact real.

    Three years went by until recently when I again switched out the tune settings for the second bike to include the supercruise settings of the first. Sure enough. Even though the carburetors are dissimilar internally, modifying them in the same percentage way and adding a few more diffusers as the other bike's supercruise settings, has resulted in the same kind of power and performance characteristics.

    I suppose this was to be expected, but given some of the particulars that are different and weren't changed, there was always a possibility that the changes would actually fail on the second bike.

    Last item to check will be to wait for the winter icy conditions to clear and do some long distance rides. Only then will I verify the other half of the supercruise performance changes. The SuperTrapp muffler appears directly key. To what extent, I'll soon find out.

    I now also have a third ZX-9R, similar to the first in design and model year, but it sports a Muzzy exhaust and conventional race tune carb settings. It is way down in both power and MPG from my two other SuperTrapp clad supercruise Ninja 9R sportbikes. Soon, though. I plan on giving the last bike a SuperTrapp muffler too. Stay tuned.
    Last edited by kz550; 02-05-2019 at 12:24 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    440

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kz550 View Post
    First off, I recently repeated some modifications to one of my ZX-9R's fueling & SuperTrapp diffuser settings that are unconventional. Well the carb settings are, not so much on the ST end. They're not conventional in the sense that they deviate slightly in significant ways from those tuning carburetor top-down or bottom up methods, but follow the overall format of top-down. The other significant factor however that makes these settings work comes from the standpoint I'm not running either the stock exhaust nor one of those other exhaust/muffler combinations from SuperTrapp's competitors. In other words, my bikes having SuperTrapp mufflers makes them unique to this model of motorcycle, less one or two other's I've stumbled across online. The engine does have to breath better in order to take advantage of these tune settings, but the way the aluminum racing series universal bolt-on works, seems to perform best...but this is only conjecture since I've only run the racing series SuperTrapp on my 9s. Other STs might perform similarly as well. That's all I'm saying.

    Some history. Back in 2008 I picked up my first ZX-9R with the intention of installing an aftermarket Supertrapp to open up some performance potential. After about a year of constant experimental modifications I settled on a sweet spot that provided better performance throughout the engine's envelope, as well as, a free boost over the bike's stock MPG capabilities. It was a win-win.

    That lasted for about seven years before I was indirectly presented with a tuning concept that bucked conventional wisdom and was an avenue I hadn't yet experimented with. Based on the layman mathematical percentages I was looking at, I figured I might be able to pick up an additional 3% better MPG, but initial test results showed that power characteristics had some trade-offs. On the plus side was an unusual boost to MPG, greater than the math was predicting.

    So not completely what I was after, but I persevered rather than giving up. I ended up having to open up my Supertrapp a couple more diffusers to take advantage of whatever was happening with the new engine flow tune. A little more tinkering inside and I arrived at a performance advantage over the previous tune in both power and MPG. I call the new settings supercruise, after the demonstrable advantages the bike has over all other bikes as overall speed increases.

    It was one thing to have other riders confirm the results as I was recording them, but I've since had two distance runs verified in recent years by an outside governing body. Either their guidelines are crap, which would throw into question all of their results for other motorcycles who've had their results measured in this way or my results are in fact real.

    Three years went by until recently when I again switched out the tune settings for the second bike to include the supercruise settings of the first. Sure enough. Even though the carburetors are dissimilar internally, modifying them in the same percentage way and adding a few more diffusers as the other bike's supercruise settings, has resulted in the same kind of power and performance characteristics.

    I suppose this was to be expected, but given some of the particulars that are different and weren't changed, there was always a possibility that the changes would actually fail on the second bike.

    Last item to check will be to wait for the winter icy conditions to clear and do some long distance rides. Only then will I verify the other half of the supercruise performance changes. The SuperTrapp muffler appears directly key. To what extent, I'll soon find out.

    I now also have a third ZX-9R, similar to the first in design and model year, but it sports a Muzzy exhaust and conventional race tune carb settings. It is way down in both power and MPG from my two other SuperTrapp clad supercruise Ninja 9R sportbikes. Soon, though. I plan on giving the last bike a SuperTrapp muffler too. Stay tuned.
    Interesting, thanks for the insight, always impressive!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    7

    Default

    That's great

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